DICP OpenIR
Subject Area物理化学
Direct catalytic conversion of biomass into glycols using tungsten- based catalysts
Wang AQ(王爱琴); Zheng MY(郑明远); Ji N(纪娜); Zhang YH(张艳华); Huang YQ(黄延强); Zhang T(张涛)
Source Publication论文集
Conference Name2010 International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies
Conference Date2010-12-15
2011
Conference Place夏威夷
Pages234-0
Publisher待补充
Publication Place待补充
Cooperation Status分会特邀报告
Department1501
Funding OrganizationCanadian Society for Chemistry etc
AbstractIntroduction The world is currently facing two important issues in fossil energy consumption, i.e., depletion of fossil energy resources and climate warming caused by CO2 emission. Using renewable resources to obtain sustainable energy supplies and chemicals is required for a prosperous world in the future. Biomass originates from plants photosynthesis with huge annual production. The sugar polymers contained in biomass are suitable platforms for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals, and has gained much attention in their transformations [1-6]. Different from many works where cellulose is first hydrolyzed into glucose by mineral acids and then transformed into other chemicals by fermentation or catalysis, our group recently discovered that cellulose can be directly converted into ethylene glycol (EG) at yields of 60-75% by using tungsten-based catalysts under hydrothermal hydrogenation conditions [7-9]. Moreover, when the feed was changed to Jerusalem artichoke tuber (JAT), which contains 70-90 wt% fructan in the dried biomass, 1,2-propylene glycol (1,2-PG) was formed as the main product [10]. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol are important bulk chemicals, which are dominantly produced from petroleum resources at present. Our work provides a novel way for biomass conversion to chemicals and thereby reduces the dependence on petroleum. In this contribution, we report our recent progress in the biomass conversion to EG and PG.; Introduction The world is currently facing two important issues in fossil energy consumption, i.e., depletion of fossil energy resources and climate warming caused by CO2 emission. Using renewable resources to obtain sustainable energy supplies and chemicals is required for a prosperous world in the future. Biomass originates from plants photosynthesis with huge annual production. The sugar polymers contained in biomass are suitable platforms for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals, and has gained much attention in their transformations [1-6]. Different from many works where cellulose is first hydrolyzed into glucose by mineral acids and then transformed into other chemicals by fermentation or catalysis, our group recently discovered that cellulose can be directly converted into ethylene glycol (EG) at yields of 60-75% by using tungsten-based catalysts under hydrothermal hydrogenation conditions [7-9]. Moreover, when the feed was changed to Jerusalem artichoke tuber (JAT), which contains 70-90 wt% fructan in the dried biomass, 1,2-propylene glycol (1,2-PG) was formed as the main product [10]. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol are important bulk chemicals, which are dominantly produced from petroleum resources at present. Our work provides a novel way for biomass conversion to chemicals and thereby reduces the dependence on petroleum. In this contribution, we report our recent progress in the biomass conversion to EG and PG.
Document Type会议论文
Identifierhttp://cas-ir.dicp.ac.cn/handle/321008/115894
Collection中国科学院大连化学物理研究所
Corresponding AuthorZhang T(张涛)
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Wang AQ,Zheng MY,Ji N,et al. Direct catalytic conversion of biomass into glycols using tungsten- based catalysts[C]. 待补充:待补充,2011:234-0.
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